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--- Carl Sagan
The Tadpoles of IC 410 - Partly obscured by foreground dust, the nebula itself surrounds NGC 1893, a young galactic cluster of stars that energizes the glowing gas. Composed of denser cooler gas and dust the tadpoles are around 10 light-years long, potentially sites of ongoing star formation. Sculpted by wind and radiation from the cluster stars, their tails trail away from the cluster’s central region. IC 410 lies some 12,000 light-years away, toward the constellation Auriga

The Tadpoles of IC 410 - Partly obscured by foreground dust, the nebula itself surrounds NGC 1893, a young galactic cluster of stars that energizes the glowing gas. Composed of denser cooler gas and dust the tadpoles are around 10 light-years long, potentially sites of ongoing star formation. Sculpted by wind and radiation from the cluster stars, their tails trail away from the cluster’s central region. IC 410 lies some 12,000 light-years away, toward the constellation Auriga

3 months ago
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IC 1396 H-Alpha - Clouds of glowing hydrogen gas mingle ominously with dark dust lanes in this close-up of IC 1396, an active star forming region some 2,000 light years away in the constellation Cepheus. In this and other similar emission nebulae, energetic ultraviolet light from a hot young star strips electrons from the surrounding hydrogen atoms. As the electrons and atoms recombine they emit longer wavelength, lower energy light in a well known characteristic pattern of bright spectral lines. At visible wavelengths, the strongest emission line in this pattern is in the red part of the spectrum and is known as “Hydrogen-alpha” or just H-alpha. Part of IPHAS, a survey of H-alpha emission in our Milky Way Galaxy, this image spans about 20 light-years and highlights bright, dense regions within IC 1396, likely sites where massive new stars are born.
Credit - Nick Wright (University College London), IPHAS Collaboration

IC 1396 H-AlphaClouds of glowing hydrogen gas mingle ominously with dark dust lanes in this close-up of IC 1396, an active star forming region some 2,000 light years away in the constellation Cepheus. In this and other similar emission nebulae, energetic ultraviolet light from a hot young star strips electrons from the surrounding hydrogen atoms. As the electrons and atoms recombine they emit longer wavelength, lower energy light in a well known characteristic pattern of bright spectral lines. At visible wavelengths, the strongest emission line in this pattern is in the red part of the spectrum and is known as “Hydrogen-alpha” or just H-alpha. Part of IPHAS, a survey of H-alpha emission in our Milky Way Galaxy, this image spans about 20 light-years and highlights bright, dense regions within IC 1396, likely sites where massive new stars are born.

Credit - Nick Wright (University College London), IPHAS Collaboration

5 months ago
19 notes
Grand Spiral Galaxy NGC 7424 - About 40 million light-years distant in the headlong constellation Grus, this island universe is also about 100,000 light-years across making it remarkably similar to our own Milky Way. Following along the winding arms, many bright clusters of massive young stars can be found. The star clusters themselves are several hundred light-years in diameter. 

Grand Spiral Galaxy NGC 7424 - About 40 million light-years distant in the headlong constellation Grus, this island universe is also about 100,000 light-years across making it remarkably similar to our own Milky Way. Following along the winding arms, many bright clusters of massive young stars can be found. The star clusters themselves are several hundred light-years in diameter. 

1 year ago
4 notes
Spiky stars and spooky shapes abound in this deep cosmic skyscape. Its well-composed field of view covers about 2 Full Moons on the sky toward the constellation Pegasus. Other galaxies far beyond the Milky Way are visible through the ghostly apparitions, including the striking spiral galaxy NGC 7497 some 60 million light-years away.

Spiky stars and spooky shapes abound in this deep cosmic skyscape. Its well-composed field of view covers about 2 Full Moons on the sky toward the constellation Pegasus. Other galaxies far beyond the Milky Way are visible through the ghostly apparitions, including the striking spiral galaxy NGC 7497 some 60 million light-years away.

1 year ago
7 notes
Constellation Pegasus

Constellation Pegasus

1 year ago
37 notes
Cataloged as Sharpless 2-308, this huge cosmic bubble lies some 5,200 light-years away toward the constellation of the Big Dog (Canis Major) and covers slightly more of the sky than a Full Moon.

Cataloged as Sharpless 2-308this huge cosmic bubble lies some 5,200 light-years away toward the constellation of the Big Dog (Canis Major) and covers slightly more of the sky than a Full Moon.

4 months ago
21 notes
Messier 17 lies some 5,500 light-years away in the nebula-rich constellation Sagittarius.

Messier 17 lies some 5,500 light-years away in the nebula-rich constellation Sagittarius.

1 year ago
31 notes
AE Aurigae and the Flaming Star Nebula - The bright star AE Aurigae, visible near the nebula center, is so hot it is blue, emitting light so energetic it knocks electrons away from atoms in the surrounding gas. When an atom recaptures an electron, light is emitted creating the surrounding emission nebula. In this cosmic portrait, the Flaming Star nebula lies about 1,500 light years distant, spans about 5 light years, and is visible with a small telescope toward the constellation of the Charioteer (Auriga).

AE Aurigae and the Flaming Star Nebula - The bright star AE Aurigae, visible near the nebula center, is so hot it is blue, emitting light so energetic it knocks electrons away from atoms in the surrounding gas. When an atom recaptures an electron, light is emitted creating the surrounding emission nebula. In this cosmic portrait, the Flaming Star nebula lies about 1,500 light years distant, spans about 5 light years, and is visible with a small telescope toward the constellation of the Charioteer (Auriga).

1 year ago
7 notes
A Perseid meteor blazes through the night sky near the constellation Cassiopeia, a celestial queen, in this eye-popping view.
Astrophotographer VegaStar Carpentier took this stunning photo on Aug.11, 2012, in Épernay, Champagne-Ardenne, France, using a Canon EOS 1000D.
The Perseid meteor shower  has been observed by humans each summer for more than 2,000 years, It occurs when the Earth passes through debris left from the comet Swift-Tuttle. The dust and ice begin to burn when it reaches Earth’s atmosphere providing a fiery display for those who watch in late July or early August.
The constellation  Cassiopeia, named after a mythical Greek queen who boasted about her beauty, can also be seen on the right of the image. This constellation is easily recognizable due to its “W” shape and bright, glimmering stars.

A Perseid meteor blazes through the night sky near the constellation Cassiopeia, a celestial queen, in this eye-popping view.

Astrophotographer VegaStar Carpentier took this stunning photo on Aug.11, 2012, in Épernay, Champagne-Ardenne, France, using a Canon EOS 1000D.

The Perseid meteor shower  has been observed by humans each summer for more than 2,000 years, It occurs when the Earth passes through debris left from the comet Swift-Tuttle. The dust and ice begin to burn when it reaches Earth’s atmosphere providing a fiery display for those who watch in late July or early August.

The constellation  Cassiopeia, named after a mythical Greek queen who boasted about her beauty, can also be seen on the right of the image. This constellation is easily recognizable due to its “W” shape and bright, glimmering stars.

(Source: space.com)

1 year ago
9 notes